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Blog - Charles River Watershed Association

Alexandra Ash

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Recent Posts

Protect Parkland and Open Space for the Public

Posted by Alexandra Ash

12/4/17 1:46 PM

Protecting Public Lands

 

We are fortunate in Massachusetts to have a long history of protecting parkland, forests, and natural areas for the enjoyment of the public and the survival of wildlife. This commitment to conserving parkland is included in Article 97 of the Massachusetts Constitution and reflects a core value of the Commonwealth. These Article 97 lands provide us with clean water, recreation, wildlife habitat, a robust tourism industry, and a strong economy. They also play a key role in reducing carbon emissions and mitigating impacts of climate change. 

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Biggest Champions of the Charles Yet

Posted by Alexandra Ash

11/9/17 10:09 AM


CRWA honored the Museum of Science at our Champions of the Charles gala on Thursday, November 2nd. The gala, held at the Museum of Science, raised funds to continue CRWA’s ongoing work monitoring and protecting the Charles River.

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Topics: Charles River

10 Ways to Celebrate National Water Quality Month

Posted by Alexandra Ash

8/16/17 12:37 PM

August is National Water Quality Month, a time to focus on what we can do to improve the quality of our rivers, streams and lakes. Healthy waterbodies contribute to healthy communities, support diverse wildlife, and provide recreation opportunities and stimulate economic development.

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Cyanobacteria bloom is a clear example of why we need environmental protections

Posted by Alexandra Ash

8/3/17 10:26 PM

There is currently a cyanobacteria outbreak in the Charles River, threatening the health of pets and interfering with folks' recreational plans. Based on field observations, the outbreak (or blooms) appears to be limited to the section of the river downstream of the Boston University Bridge. The Department of Conservation and Recreation urges the public to avoid contact with the water and to prevent pets from drinking it. 

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24 Tips to Save Water

Posted by Alexandra Ash

6/19/17 12:39 PM

Water conservation is important to make sure that there is enough water for drinking, growing food and fighting fires, especially in the summer and during periods of drought. Water shortages not only impact your community, they also harm the Charles River. The more water cities and towns need to pump to meet the demand of their residents, the less groundwater makes its way into the Charles River, harming fish and wildlife. If you live in Dedham and Westwood, you can download a free app to track your water usage and save water! 

Below are some water saving tips to get you started saving water. 

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Green Budget: Massachusetts needs 1% for the environment

Posted by Alexandra Ash

4/18/17 1:31 PM

Currently only 0.5% of the state operating budget supports environmental agencies, agencies that are asked to do more with less—including responding to the drought, reducing emissions, ensuring clean water and preparing for the impacts of climate change.CRWA, as a member of the Green Budget Coalition, advocates for allocating 1% of the state budget for the environment. The Green Budget recommendations include increased spending for climate change adaptation, improving water quality, protecting wetlands, restoring habitat and maintaining parks.

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Take action to protect the environment and the Charles River

Posted by Alexandra Ash

3/24/17 2:11 PM

Updated 4/18/2017

Looking for ways to get more involved in in protecting the environment? Let your voice be heard! Now more than ever, effective laws, policies, regulations, and permits, and their strong implementation at the local, state and federal levels matter for the environment and the Charles River. Grassroots action often makes the difference. Sign up for The River Current, CRWA’s e-newsletterto receive action alerts and project news. Click here to read our recent action alert

Below are a few ideas to get you started.  

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Removing dams can improve river health

Posted by Alexandra Ash

12/20/16 10:09 AM

Updated 3/23/17

Built to generate power for industry in the 18th and 19th centuries, dams served an important role in the history of the Charles River watershed. However, dams slowed the flow of the Charles River, hampering its ability to cleanse itself. Dams also prevented migratory river herring from reaching upstream reaches of the river to spawn. While some Charles River dams provide flood control, many of the dams on the Charles River bring more problems than benefits. When dams become obsolete, their removal can benefit rivers and the surrounding communities. These Frequently Asked Questions discuss the benefits and challenges of dam removal. 

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The Year in Review- Highlights from 2016

Posted by Alexandra Ash

12/14/16 9:59 AM

2016 marked important milestones for the restoration of the Charles River and its watershed: the elimination of heat pollution from the Kendall Power Plant, the daylighting of the Muddy River, and the removal of the hazardous sandbar near Brighton. 2016 also saw the worst drought since the 1960's, persistent stormwater pollution, another cyanobacteria bloom in the Charles River Lower Basin, and the nomination of a new US EPA Administrator who questions climate change. Through it all, CRWA passionately continued our work throughout the watershed developing smart, green water infrastructure, promoting restorative ways to reduce stormwater pollution and flooding, and advocating for strong and effective water policy and regulations. We couldn't have done this work without you—thank you! 

Below are just a few of the highlights from 2016. 

 

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Cyanobacteria Outbreak in Lower Charles River

Posted by Alexandra Ash

8/30/16 4:06 PM

Water samples collected last Thursday confirmed a cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae, outbreak in the Charles River Lower Basin downstream of the Massachusetts Avenue Bridge.

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About Charles River Watershed Association:

One of the country's oldest watershed organizations, Charles River Watershed Association (CRWA) was formed in 1965 in response to public concern about the declining condition of the Charles. Since its earliest days of advocacy, CRWA has figured prominently in major clean-up and watershed protection efforts, working with government officials and citizen groups from 35 Massachusetts watershed towns from Hopkinton to Boston. Initiatives over the last fifty years have dramatically improved the quality of water in the watershed and fundamentally changed approaches to water resource management.