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Blog - Charles River Watershed Association

Nishaila Porter

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Good News for Renewable Energy

Posted by Nishaila Porter

8/24/16 12:21 PM

Energy bill signed into law
Barrow Offshore wind turbines

Sheringham Shoal Offshore Wind Farm, England.
Source: Andy Dingley, edit Muhammad | CC BY-SA 3.0


On August 8th, Governor Baker signed into law “An Act to Promote Energy Diversity.” While not perfect, the law moves Massachusetts in the right direction by supporting renewable energy.  It will allow Massachusetts to diversify its energy supply and to meet Greenhouse Gas (GHG) reduction mandates imposed under the 2008 Global Warming Solutions Act (GWSA). The GWSA calls for all sectors to reduce GHG emissions by 25% by 2020 and by 80% by 2050. By facilitating the production of hydroelectric and offshore wind power, the energy law will help the Commonwealth comply with these mandates. The offshore wind power will be the nation’s first commercial scale offshore wind farm. These power sources will further advance renewable and clean power technology in Massachusetts. 

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Charles River Watershed Association Restores Habitat to Magazine Beach

Posted by Nishaila Porter

8/10/16 5:33 PM

False Indigo

Cut false indigo at Magazine Beach

This year, Charles River Watershed Association (CRWA) will restore wildlife habitat and improve water quality in the Charles River. This project is funded by a competitive grant CRWA received from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation through their Five Star and Urban Waters Restoration Program. The two-year grant was awarded for enhancements to DCR’s Magazine Beach in Cambridgeport and will fund CRWA’s work to restore existing wetlands, add and maintain rain gardens, and remove invasive weeds at the park.

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11 Tips to Conserving Water Indoors

Posted by Nishaila Porter

8/9/16 5:39 PM

The Charles River is at record low flows and the entire watershed is in severe or extreme drought. Predictions are that the drought will continue through October. Save water indoors by running full loads in washing machines and dishwashers, shortening showers and flushing toilets less often. Outdoors, stop watering and let your lawn fade to brown. It will revive with cooler weather and rainfall. Join the effort to conserve water.

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Charles River in Severe Drought

Posted by Nishaila Porter

8/9/16 2:12 PM

Updated 8/18/2016

 

Central and Northeast Massachusetts are suffering from severe and extreme drought. Dry conditions have been persistent in New England for the past 5 months. On August 13, Secretary Matthew Beaton issued a drought warning —the highest level before an emergency is declared—for Central and Northeast Massachusetts. EEA recommends banning outdoor water use (excluding agricultural uses). Please do your part to save water during this drought. Stop watering and let your lawn fade to brown. It will revive with cooler weather and rainfall.

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17th Annual Earth Day Charles River Cleanup

Posted by Nishaila Porter

5/31/16 2:42 PM

Cambridge-CRC-EarthDay04302016_-4_.jpgAn effort to beautify the Charles River and surrounding parklands came to fruition on Saturday, April 30th, as the Charles River Watershed Association (CRWA) in collaboration with a team of diverse local organizations including: Charles River Conservancy, the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation, the Emerald Necklace Conservancy, The Esplanade Association, State Senator Will Brownsberger’s office and The Waltham Land Trust hosted the 17th Annual Earth Day Charles River Cleanup. This day, representative of communal efforts to preserve public space is in coalition with the American Rivers National River Cleanup.

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About Charles River Watershed Association:

One of the country's oldest watershed organizations, Charles River Watershed Association (CRWA) was formed in 1965 in response to public concern about the declining condition of the Charles. Since its earliest days of advocacy, CRWA has figured prominently in major clean-up and watershed protection efforts, working with government officials and citizen groups from 35 Massachusetts watershed towns from Hopkinton to Boston. Initiatives over the last fifty years have dramatically improved the quality of water in the watershed and fundamentally changed approaches to water resource management.