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Blog - Charles River Watershed Association

Charles River Watershed Association Announces New Executive Director

Posted by Nishaila Porter

6/14/18 12:10 PM

Emily Norton 1WESTON, MA – The Charles River Watershed Association announces that it has named Emily Norton, who is currently director of the Massachusetts Chapter of the Sierra Club, as CRWA’s new executive director. She succeeds longtime CRWA Executive Director Bob Zimmerman.

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Green Streets: A prescription for water pollution

Posted by Nick King

4/24/18 10:58 AM

Guest blog post by fisherman, retired Boston Globe writer and CRWA volunteer Nick King

I woke up recently with a nasty case of pavement anxiety disorder. I was anxious about all the potholes on my street and why they weren’t being fixed. But I was even more anxious about the sheer expanse of pavement everywhere - and how that was holding Mother Nature’s rainwater hostage.

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3 ways CRWA uses nature-based solutions to reduce floods, droughts and water pollution

Posted by Kate Bowditch

3/22/18 1:06 PM

Today, as I write this post, it’s World Water Day, celebrated around the world as an opportunity to highlight successes, share ideas and stories and focus attention on the importance of water. This year’s World Water Day theme is ‘Nature for Water’ – exploring nature-based solutions to the water challenges we face in the 21st century.

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Visioning a better Mass Pike Allston Interchange

Posted by Margaret VanDeusen

3/12/18 3:12 PM

As you may have heard, the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (massDOT) plans to rebuild the Mass Pike Allston Interchange over the next decade to replace aging infrastructure. Meanwhile, Harvard University is developing plans for its Enterprise Research Campus nearby. The concurrence of these projects while Boston is striving to achieve climate resiliency provides an exceptional opportunity to create a green neighborhood which promotes access to the river while providing resiliency to climate change. It's an opportunity we can't afford to miss.

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The best use of Widett Circle? Don’t develop it at all

Posted by Robert Zimmerman

1/5/18 1:57 PM

As Boston recovers from winter storm Greyson,  we are reminded of the serious damage and flooding a severe storm can cause our communities. Yesterday's storm dropped 17 inches of snow on the greater Boston area and flooded coastal communities. Record high tides flooded Boston's Seaport District, damaging property, halting travel and creating dangerous conditions for anyone who needed to venture out. The storm serves as a reminder that we need to take steps to prepare Boston and coastal communities for the extreme storms and intense flooding that will accompany climate change. And we need to do it now.

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Highlights from 2017

Posted by Alexandra Ash

12/17/17 8:19 PM

2017 was a busy year for environmental organizations nationwide—including Charles River Watershed Association— as we fought for the continued enforcement of environmental laws. On a local level in Massachusetts, we advocated for policies and projects that will help our communities adapt to extreme storms and frequent drought. Throughout the year we continued our core field science work and expanded the Blue Cities demonstration projects that are greening neighborhoods throughout the watershed. Each day we do this work we are thankful to you for making it possible!

Please consider giving a year-end gift to support CRWA's powerful advocacy and river restoration in 2018.

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Protect Parkland and Open Space for the Public

Posted by Alexandra Ash

12/4/17 1:46 PM

Protecting Public Lands

 

We are fortunate in Massachusetts to have a long history of protecting parkland, forests, and natural areas for the enjoyment of the public and the survival of wildlife. This commitment to conserving parkland is included in Article 97 of the Massachusetts Constitution and reflects a core value of the Commonwealth. These Article 97 lands provide us with clean water, recreation, wildlife habitat, a robust tourism industry, and a strong economy. They also play a key role in reducing carbon emissions and mitigating impacts of climate change. 

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Findings from summer water sampling

Posted by Catie Colliton

12/1/17 12:20 PM

In its 16th season, our Water Quality Notification Program has continued to keep the public informed of the Charles River’s conditions with the assistance of 10 local boathouse partners in the Lower Basin. Between June 27th and October 19th, our interns collected 140 water samples and took water temperature and depth readings from four sites along the river: the North Beacon Street Bridge, the Larz Anderson Bridge, the Boston University Bridge, and the Longfellow Bridge.

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Biggest Champions of the Charles Yet

Posted by Alexandra Ash

11/9/17 10:09 AM


CRWA honored the Museum of Science at our Champions of the Charles gala on Thursday, November 2nd. The gala, held at the Museum of Science, raised funds to continue CRWA’s ongoing work monitoring and protecting the Charles River.

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Topics: Charles River

Our changing climate, it’s time to act!

Posted by Julie Dyer Wood

9/8/17 12:01 PM

As Houston continues to recover from Hurricane Harvey, Hurricane Irma batters the Caribbean and heads toward Florida, and Mexico prepares for Hurricane Katia, our thoughts go out to all those effected by these devastating storms. As the Boston Globe reports, global climate change is increasing the likelihood and frequency of powerful hurricanes and other storms. The northeast has already experienced a 71% increase between 1958 and 2012 in the amount of rain that falls in very intense storms.

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About Charles River Watershed Association:

One of the country's oldest watershed organizations, Charles River Watershed Association (CRWA) was formed in 1965 in response to public concern about the declining condition of the Charles. Since its earliest days of advocacy, CRWA has figured prominently in major clean-up and watershed protection efforts, working with government officials and citizen groups from 35 Massachusetts watershed towns from Hopkinton to Boston. Initiatives over the last fifty years have dramatically improved the quality of water in the watershed and fundamentally changed approaches to water resource management.