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Blog - Charles River Watershed Association

Protect Parkland and Open Space for the Public

Posted by Alexandra Ash

12/4/17 1:46 PM

Protecting Public Lands

 

We are fortunate in Massachusetts to have a long history of protecting parkland, forests, and natural areas for the enjoyment of the public and the survival of wildlife. This commitment to conserving parkland is included in Article 97 of the Massachusetts Constitution and reflects a core value of the Commonwealth. These Article 97 lands provide us with clean water, recreation, wildlife habitat, a robust tourism industry, and a strong economy. They also play a key role in reducing carbon emissions and mitigating impacts of climate change. 

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Findings from summer water sampling

Posted by Catie Colliton

12/1/17 12:20 PM

In its 16th season, our Water Quality Notification Program has continued to keep the public informed of the Charles River’s conditions with the assistance of 10 local boathouse partners in the Lower Basin. Between June 27th and October 19th, our interns collected 140 water samples and took water temperature and depth readings from four sites along the river: the North Beacon Street Bridge, the Larz Anderson Bridge, the Boston University Bridge, and the Longfellow Bridge.

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Biggest Champions of the Charles Yet

Posted by Alexandra Ash

11/9/17 10:09 AM


CRWA honored the Museum of Science at our Champions of the Charles gala on Thursday, November 2nd. The gala, held at the Museum of Science, raised funds to continue CRWA’s ongoing work monitoring and protecting the Charles River.

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Topics: Charles River

Our changing climate, it’s time to act!

Posted by Julie Dyer Wood

9/8/17 12:01 PM

As Houston continues to recover from Hurricane Harvey, Hurricane Irma batters the Caribbean and heads toward Florida, and Mexico prepares for Hurricane Katia, our thoughts go out to all those effected by these devastating storms. As the Boston Globe reports, global climate change is increasing the likelihood and frequency of powerful hurricanes and other storms. The northeast has already experienced a 71% increase between 1958 and 2012 in the amount of rain that falls in very intense storms.

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10 Ways to Celebrate National Water Quality Month

Posted by Alexandra Ash

8/16/17 12:37 PM

August is National Water Quality Month, a time to focus on what we can do to improve the quality of our rivers, streams and lakes. Healthy waterbodies contribute to healthy communities, support diverse wildlife, and provide recreation opportunities and stimulate economic development.

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Dig into the Depths of the Charles River

Posted by Elisabeth Cianciola

7/31/17 8:54 PM

map 

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24 Tips to Save Water

Posted by Alexandra Ash

6/19/17 12:39 PM

Water conservation is important to make sure that there is enough water for drinking, growing food and fighting fires, especially in the summer and during periods of drought. Water shortages not only impact your community, they also harm the Charles River. The more water cities and towns need to pump to meet the demand of their residents, the less groundwater makes its way into the Charles River, harming fish and wildlife. If you live in Dedham and Westwood, you can download a free app to track your water usage and save water! 

Below are some water saving tips to get you started saving water. 

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Charles River Herring Run 2017

Posted by Elisabeth Cianciola

5/18/17 12:00 PM

Blog post by CRWA's Aquatic Scientist

The herring are back! It's that time of year; alewife and bluback herring have once again returned to the Charles River to spawn. Estimates of the river herring population on the Charles run upwards of 300,000 fish, making our herring run one of the largest in Massachusetts. Based on historic observations, we expect that the majority of herring, approximately 80% of the run, will pass through the Watertown Dam within the next week. The fish ladder the herring will use to swim against the current over the dam is on the southern bank of the river, but you can easily see the fish waiting in calmer waters under trees just below the dam from the Charles River Greenway on the north bank of the river. If you have polarized sunglasses, you can get an even better view! If you are unable to walk or bike to the Watertown Dam, limited parking is available at the DCR parking lot off of Pleasant Street on the north side of the river and on the side of California Street on the south side of the River. Fish that pass over the Watertown Dam continue their journey upstream in search of streams that feed into the Charles River, such as Beaver Brook and Stony Brook in Waltham and the newly-restored Fuller Brook, Rosemary Brook, and Waban Brook in Wellesley. Some herring do not continue up to the Watertown Dam after passing through the locks at Boston Harbor and instead swim up the Muddy River in Boston. If you see herring or other fish in the Charles River or one of its tributary streams, send us your photos on Facebook or Twitter!

 

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Stocking the Charles River with Trout

Posted by Nick King

5/11/17 10:42 AM

Guest blog post by fisherman, retired Boston Globe writer and CRWA volunteer Nick King

Much has been written, and rightly so, about the tremendous progress that has been made in cleaning up the Charles so that it is, at times, a swimmable river. Much less publicized is the fact that the Charles is increasingly fishable too, and I don’t mean just for its plentiful native bass, pickerel, carp and panfish but also for the wiliest and most sought-after species the trout.

 

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Identifying Invasive Plants in the Charles River

Posted by Elisabeth Cianciola

5/3/17 10:18 AM

The aquatic plant community in the Charles River watershed is unfortunately dominated by invasive plants. Polluted stormwater runoff carrying nutrient pollution allows these plants to grow out of control. Here are a few of the most common invasive aquatic plants you’ll encounter along the Charles.

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About Charles River Watershed Association:

One of the country's oldest watershed organizations, Charles River Watershed Association (CRWA) was formed in 1965 in response to public concern about the declining condition of the Charles. Since its earliest days of advocacy, CRWA has figured prominently in major clean-up and watershed protection efforts, working with government officials and citizen groups from 35 Massachusetts watershed towns from Hopkinton to Boston. Initiatives over the last fifty years have dramatically improved the quality of water in the watershed and fundamentally changed approaches to water resource management.