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Blog - Charles River Watershed Association

3 ways CRWA uses nature-based solutions to reduce floods, droughts and water pollution

Posted by Kate Bowditch

3/22/18 1:06 PM

Today, as I write this post, it’s World Water Day, celebrated around the world as an opportunity to highlight successes, share ideas and stories and focus attention on the importance of water. This year’s World Water Day theme is ‘Nature for Water’ – exploring nature-based solutions to the water challenges we face in the 21st century.

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Visioning a better Mass Pike Allston Interchange

Posted by Margaret VanDeusen

3/12/18 3:12 PM

As you may have heard, the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (massDOT) plans to rebuild the Mass Pike Allston Interchange over the next decade to replace aging infrastructure. Meanwhile, Harvard University is developing plans for its Enterprise Research Campus nearby. The concurrence of these projects while Boston is striving to achieve climate resiliency provides an exceptional opportunity to create a green neighborhood which promotes access to the river while providing resiliency to climate change. It's an opportunity we can't afford to miss.

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The best use of Widett Circle? Don’t develop it at all

Posted by Robert Zimmerman

1/5/18 1:57 PM

As Boston recovers from winter storm Greyson,  we are reminded of the serious damage and flooding a severe storm can cause our communities. Yesterday's storm dropped 17 inches of snow on the greater Boston area and flooded coastal communities. Record high tides flooded Boston's Seaport District, damaging property, halting travel and creating dangerous conditions for anyone who needed to venture out. The storm serves as a reminder that we need to take steps to prepare Boston and coastal communities for the extreme storms and intense flooding that will accompany climate change. And we need to do it now.

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Our changing climate, it’s time to act!

Posted by Julie Dyer Wood

9/8/17 12:01 PM

As Houston continues to recover from Hurricane Harvey, Hurricane Irma batters the Caribbean and heads toward Florida, and Mexico prepares for Hurricane Katia, our thoughts go out to all those effected by these devastating storms. As the Boston Globe reports, global climate change is increasing the likelihood and frequency of powerful hurricanes and other storms. The northeast has already experienced a 71% increase between 1958 and 2012 in the amount of rain that falls in very intense storms.

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Twelve Days of Paris - An Overview of the 2015 Paris Climate Conference

Posted by Julie Dyer Wood

12/23/15 3:02 PM

Child with Christmas tree

From November 30th to December 14th, global world leaders met in Paris to discuss global climate change. The 2015 Paris Climate Conference, or COP21, produced the first global agreement on a process and pathway to stem the tide of global warming. While this was truly a historic event, it fell at a time when many of us are preoccupied by our own, less global, challenges, such as what should I get my father-in-law? What do I bake for my Aunt’s party? Did I already get year-end gifts for my kid’s teacher? And why does my husband keep playing that same holiday music CD over and over?  So for those of you who might have been a bit distracted by the season, a COP summary to the tune that is already stuck in your head.

 

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Water Transformation Part 10: The Benefits

Posted by Robert Zimmerman

4/15/15 1:01 PM

PREVIOUS POST: Water Transformation Part 9 - Restored Streams and Green  Infrastructure

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Water Transformation Part 9: Restored Streams and Green Infrastructure

Posted by Robert Zimmerman

4/6/15 4:51 PM

PREVIOUS POST: Water Transformation Part 8 - Distributed Wastewater Treatment  Plants

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Water Transformation Part 8: Distributed Wastewater Treatment Plants

Posted by Robert Zimmerman

3/30/15 1:30 PM

PREVIOUS POST: Water Transformation Part 7 - Beginning the How

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Water Transformation Part 7: Beginning the How

Posted by Robert Zimmerman

3/20/15 3:20 PM

PREVIOUS POST: Water Transformation Part 6: Configuring Transformation II  


Back Bay Charles River - Charles River Watershed AssociationCRWA began what we call our Urban Smart Sewer project in the fall of 2013 with a three year grant from the Scherman Foundation's Rosin Fund, and support from Eaglemere Foundation. Our first orders of business were to discover whether the distributed wastewater treatment plants we had investigated with our Littleton, MA, Smart Sewer project could be sited in dense urban confines. To help us, we put together a technical advisory committee (TAC) made up of principals from federal, state, and Boston agencies.

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Water Transformation Part 6: Configuring Transformation II

Posted by Robert Zimmerman

3/10/15 1:28 PM

PREVIOUS POST: Water Transformation Part 5 - Configuring Transformation I

 

Stream Daylighting - Charles River Watershed Association
Daylighted Saw Mill River, Yonkers, NY
Photo by Zach Youngerman

In my last post, I introduced the concept of distributed wastewater treatment as an important tool for getting distributed energy generation and water reclamation, and increased resilience, while Restoring Nature. Building on the concept, we at Charles River Watershed Association (CRWA) have been looking at collecting wastewater, treating it, and infiltrating it into the ground near each of the treatment plants. Most distributed wastewater treatment plant conceptualizations I’ve seen would send reclaimed water once reused back to the piped sewage system it was originally collected from. If we were to do that, though we would capture the energy and reclaimed water, we would miss a significant environmental opportunity.


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About Charles River Watershed Association:

One of the country's oldest watershed organizations, Charles River Watershed Association (CRWA) was formed in 1965 in response to public concern about the declining condition of the Charles. Since its earliest days of advocacy, CRWA has figured prominently in major clean-up and watershed protection efforts, working with government officials and citizen groups from 35 Massachusetts watershed towns from Hopkinton to Boston. Initiatives over the last fifty years have dramatically improved the quality of water in the watershed and fundamentally changed approaches to water resource management.