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Blog - Charles River Watershed Association

Green Streets: A prescription for water pollution

Posted by Nick King

4/24/18 10:58 AM

Guest blog post by fisherman, retired Boston Globe writer and CRWA volunteer Nick King

I woke up recently with a nasty case of pavement anxiety disorder. I was anxious about all the potholes on my street and why they weren’t being fixed. But I was even more anxious about the sheer expanse of pavement everywhere - and how that was holding Mother Nature’s rainwater hostage.

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GreenUp for the Charles River

Posted by Alexandra Ash

4/12/18 1:23 PM

Help CRWA win $15,000 for the Charles River, Clean Water, and Resilient Communities!

 

Vote to help Charles River Watershed Association win a $15,000 grant from JetBlue for Good and support important work protecting the Charles River and building resilient communities.
VoteThis month—Earth Month—JetBlue For Good is turning up the green by awarding grants of $15,000 each to 4 earth-friendly causes. CRWA is one of 12 organizations competing—and the only one based in Massachusetts! Vote for Charles River Watershed Association today and each day through April 31st. Your vote also enters you to win 2 roundtrip travel certificates.

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3 ways CRWA uses nature-based solutions to reduce floods, droughts and water pollution

Posted by Kate Bowditch

3/22/18 1:06 PM

Today, as I write this post, it’s World Water Day, celebrated around the world as an opportunity to highlight successes, share ideas and stories and focus attention on the importance of water. This year’s World Water Day theme is ‘Nature for Water’ – exploring nature-based solutions to the water challenges we face in the 21st century.

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Visioning a better Mass Pike Allston Interchange

Posted by Margaret VanDeusen

3/12/18 3:12 PM

As you may have heard, the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (massDOT) plans to rebuild the Mass Pike Allston Interchange over the next decade to replace aging infrastructure. Meanwhile, Harvard University is developing plans for its Enterprise Research Campus nearby. The concurrence of these projects while Boston is striving to achieve climate resiliency provides an exceptional opportunity to create a green neighborhood which promotes access to the river while providing resiliency to climate change. It's an opportunity we can't afford to miss.

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The best use of Widett Circle? Don’t develop it at all

Posted by Robert Zimmerman

1/5/18 1:57 PM

As Boston recovers from winter storm Greyson,  we are reminded of the serious damage and flooding a severe storm can cause our communities. Yesterday's storm dropped 17 inches of snow on the greater Boston area and flooded coastal communities. Record high tides flooded Boston's Seaport District, damaging property, halting travel and creating dangerous conditions for anyone who needed to venture out. The storm serves as a reminder that we need to take steps to prepare Boston and coastal communities for the extreme storms and intense flooding that will accompany climate change. And we need to do it now.

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Highlights from 2017

Posted by Alexandra Ash

12/17/17 8:19 PM

2017 was a busy year for environmental organizations nationwide—including Charles River Watershed Association— as we fought for the continued enforcement of environmental laws. On a local level in Massachusetts, we advocated for policies and projects that will help our communities adapt to extreme storms and frequent drought. Throughout the year we continued our core field science work and expanded the Blue Cities demonstration projects that are greening neighborhoods throughout the watershed. Each day we do this work we are thankful to you for making it possible!

Please consider giving a year-end gift to support CRWA's powerful advocacy and river restoration in 2018.

 Donate

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Our changing climate, it’s time to act!

Posted by Julie Dyer Wood

9/8/17 12:01 PM

As Houston continues to recover from Hurricane Harvey, Hurricane Irma batters the Caribbean and heads toward Florida, and Mexico prepares for Hurricane Katia, our thoughts go out to all those effected by these devastating storms. As the Boston Globe reports, global climate change is increasing the likelihood and frequency of powerful hurricanes and other storms. The northeast has already experienced a 71% increase between 1958 and 2012 in the amount of rain that falls in very intense storms.

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10 Ways to Celebrate National Water Quality Month

Posted by Alexandra Ash

8/16/17 12:37 PM

August is National Water Quality Month, a time to focus on what we can do to improve the quality of our rivers, streams and lakes. Healthy waterbodies contribute to healthy communities, support diverse wildlife, and provide recreation opportunities and stimulate economic development.

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The Year in Review- Highlights from 2016

Posted by Alexandra Ash

12/14/16 9:59 AM

2016 marked important milestones for the restoration of the Charles River and its watershed: the elimination of heat pollution from the Kendall Power Plant, the daylighting of the Muddy River, and the removal of the hazardous sandbar near Brighton. 2016 also saw the worst drought since the 1960's, persistent stormwater pollution, another cyanobacteria bloom in the Charles River Lower Basin, and the nomination of a new US EPA Administrator who questions climate change. Through it all, CRWA passionately continued our work throughout the watershed developing smart, green water infrastructure, promoting restorative ways to reduce stormwater pollution and flooding, and advocating for strong and effective water policy and regulations. We couldn't have done this work without you—thank you! 

Below are just a few of the highlights from 2016. 

 

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9 Ways to Combat Cyanobacteria Blooms in the Charles River

Posted by Allie Rowe

10/10/16 3:48 PM

What is cyanobacteria? Why is it a concern?

cyanobacteria

Cyanobacteria bloom in a freshwater pond
Source: Christian Fischer | CC BY-SA 3.0

Cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, are microorganisms that obtain their energy through photosynthesis and live in aquatic environments. Cyanobacteria populations can grow rapidly in fresh water, brackish water, or seawater during events known as “blooms.” Blooms often appear as dense green mats floating on or just below the water’s surface. Cyanobacteria blooms can produce toxins that harm humans, dogs, and wildlife. Exposure to these toxins may irritate the eyes, ears, and skin, and can also damage to the liver and nervous system. Emerging science shows a possible link to neurodegenerative diseases and a possibility of exposure through inhalation. Thick mats of cyanobacteria block sunlight and oxygen from entering the water, smothering fish and other aquatic organisms.

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About Charles River Watershed Association:

One of the country's oldest watershed organizations, Charles River Watershed Association (CRWA) was formed in 1965 in response to public concern about the declining condition of the Charles. Since its earliest days of advocacy, CRWA has figured prominently in major clean-up and watershed protection efforts, working with government officials and citizen groups from 35 Massachusetts watershed towns from Hopkinton to Boston. Initiatives over the last fifty years have dramatically improved the quality of water in the watershed and fundamentally changed approaches to water resource management.