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Blog - Charles River Watershed Association

The Wonderful Story of the Charles River

Posted by Kate Bowditch

6/26/18 5:45 PM

kateThursday, June 21st was the summer solstice and CRWA celebrated with about 120 people on the docks at Community Boating along the Charles River in Boston. What a marvelous night we had! As the sun set, we toasted the longest day of the year, dancing, eating and laughing the night away.

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CRWA Volunteers Get Their Feet Wet

Posted by Elisabeth Cianciola

6/25/18 1:34 PM

Elisabeth Cianciola, CRWA Aquatic Scientist

WESTON – Despite gloomy skies, volunteers from across the Charles River Watershed and beyond gathered on Saturday, June 23rd to learn how to collect benthic macroinvertebrates and assess stream habitat as part of CRWA's volunteer biological water quality monitoring program. Now in its sixth year, the biological water quality monitoring program welcomes volunteers of all ages and abilities to help CRWA track changes in water quality over time.

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The Bluebacks are Back

Posted by Nick King

6/18/18 3:13 PM

Guest blog post by fisherman, retired Boston Globe writer and CRWA volunteer Nick King

WATERTOWN – There are lots of new commuters passing through town these days and they’re dwarfing by tenfold the human population of this community on the Charles River. The newcomers are river herring, and their annual spring migration is in full force, bringing hundreds of thousands of them into and up the Charles, many schooling below and above the Watertown dam.

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Charles River Watershed Association Announces New Executive Director

Posted by Nishaila Porter

6/14/18 12:10 PM

Emily Norton 1WESTON, MA – The Charles River Watershed Association announces that it has named Emily Norton, who is currently director of the Massachusetts Chapter of the Sierra Club, as CRWA’s new executive director. She succeeds longtime CRWA Executive Director Bob Zimmerman.

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2017 Charles River water quality report: better than before, but room to improve.

Posted by Theo Collins

5/2/18 12:22 PM

It’s here! Yes we’re talking about the weather, as it seems that we’ve finally shaken off winter with some halcyon spring days. But we’re also celebrating the release of CRWA’s The 2017 Charles River Annual Water Quality Report! Since 1995, CRWA's Volunteer Monthly Monitoring Program has used a corps of over 75 volunteer citizen scientists to collect water samples from 35 sites along the Charles and its tributaries once each month and deliver them to us. We deliver these samples to Massachusetts Water Resource Authority (MWRA) to test for various pollutants and then analyze the results that they send back. We post the E. coli results every month, and while this can provide a quick way to gauge the cleanliness of the river on those days, it is only part of the story. The annual water quality report details results from all the parameters we measure in addition to E. coli: Nitrogen, Phosphorous, chlorophyll-a, Enterococcus bacteria, temperature, depth, and macroinvertebrate biodiversity and abundance. Analyzing all of these parameters across the whole year provides a broader perspective and a more general picture of the Charles River ecosystem’s health.

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Volunteers make for a truly amazing weekend on the Charles

Posted by Kate Bowditch

4/30/18 5:25 PM

As I sit at my desk this chilly, gray Monday, after a long and joyful weekend that featured both CRWA’s Charles River Cleanup and the Run of the CharlesBoston's Premier Paddling Race, I am admittedly a little tired. But far more than fatigue, what I am mostly feeling is an amazement and wonder at the power of CRWA’s volunteers.

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Green Streets: A prescription for water pollution

Posted by Nick King

4/24/18 10:58 AM

Guest blog post by fisherman, retired Boston Globe writer and CRWA volunteer Nick King

I woke up recently with a nasty case of pavement anxiety disorder. I was anxious about all the potholes on my street and why they weren’t being fixed. But I was even more anxious about the sheer expanse of pavement everywhere - and how that was holding Mother Nature’s rainwater hostage.

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GreenUp for the Charles River

Posted by Alexandra Ash

4/12/18 1:23 PM

Help CRWA win $15,000 for the Charles River, Clean Water, and Resilient Communities!

 

Vote to help Charles River Watershed Association win a $15,000 grant from JetBlue for Good and support important work protecting the Charles River and building resilient communities.
VoteThis month—Earth Month—JetBlue For Good is turning up the green by awarding grants of $15,000 each to 4 earth-friendly causes. CRWA is one of 12 organizations competing—and the only one based in Massachusetts! Vote for Charles River Watershed Association today and each day through April 31st. Your vote also enters you to win 2 roundtrip travel certificates.

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3 ways CRWA uses nature-based solutions to reduce floods, droughts and water pollution

Posted by Kate Bowditch

3/22/18 1:06 PM

Today, as I write this post, it’s World Water Day, celebrated around the world as an opportunity to highlight successes, share ideas and stories and focus attention on the importance of water. This year’s World Water Day theme is ‘Nature for Water’ – exploring nature-based solutions to the water challenges we face in the 21st century.

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Celebrating National Groundwater Awareness Week

Posted by Theo Collins

3/14/18 4:49 PM

It’s National Groundwater Awareness Week! To celebrate, we'll share why groundwater is such an important resource here in MA, and acknowledge the work some of our partners have done to conserve groundwater.

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About Charles River Watershed Association:

One of the country's oldest watershed organizations, Charles River Watershed Association (CRWA) was formed in 1965 in response to public concern about the declining condition of the Charles. Since its earliest days of advocacy, CRWA has figured prominently in major clean-up and watershed protection efforts, working with government officials and citizen groups from 35 Massachusetts watershed towns from Hopkinton to Boston. Initiatives over the last fifty years have dramatically improved the quality of water in the watershed and fundamentally changed approaches to water resource management.